Headlines: "Shameful" protests and plans to help the economy

Headlines: “Shameful” protests and plans to help the economy

Headlines: “Shameful” protests and plans to help the economy


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A picture of the protesters, who clashed with police in London on Saturday, appears in the introduction to several newspapers. The Sunday Mirror newspaper called the extreme right-wing protests “shameful”, saying that the “far-right crowd” had kidnapped a demonstration in London.

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The Sunday Telegraph also bears a picture of the police in riot gear. It is reported that ministers are studying plans to facilitate the prosecution of people who defile war memorials, including with possible prison terms of up to 10 years. The newspaper adds that the measures could also include some statues that are currently being focused on by some protesters.

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On Sunday’s front page, Mel tries to ask what happened to “the tolerant Britain we love.” But her main story revolves around the social divide rule of 2 million, after warnings that there might be millions of job losses in the hospitality sector if the base is not dropped. The Mail says Boris Johnson “personally” controls the decision on the 2 million rule. The newspaper pointed out that it issued a review No. 10 “will effectively extract control” on directing social distances from scholars.

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Concerns about the state of the British economy were also mentioned in the Sunday Express. The newspaper passes at the request of Chancellor Rishi Sonak, who urges people to head to their local main street and shop safely to help the economy recover. Non-core stores can be opened in England from Monday, and Mr. Sonak said, “It is important that we all do our duty to help.”

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The Sunday People newspaper reported that a total of 800 families whose relatives had died from coronavirus in nursing homes had requested a general investigation. Human rights lawyer Lyne Devine, who represented families in the aftermath of the Hillsborough disaster, tells the newspaper that she has been contacted by hundreds of families “who want the truth.” The government says there will be an opportunity to look back and learn lessons at some point.

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The Observer spoke to Children’s Commissioner in England, Ann Longfield, who warned that limiting access to education was allowed to become “the default” in some schools. She suggests that children’s fundamental right to education could be at risk, and she adds that it is a “very dangerous place”. The newspaper says that there is “increasing frustration” among teachers, representatives and unions about “the random return of schools.”

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The Sunday Times story is about plans – developed under the auspices of former Prime Minister Theresa May – to allow transgender people to change their birth certificates without a medical diagnosis. The newspaper says information has been leaked showing that the plans were canceled. Instead, alternative plans have been proposed, including a ban on “gay treatment” treatments and new protection for women-only spaces. It comes after a consultation on the Gender Recognition Act, which received more than 100,000 responses.

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The Daily Star newspaper reported that animal rights groups are “in a flap” after eight of the Queen’s racing pigeons died while in quarantine. The birds were sent to South Africa to participate in a race but were put in boxes and died. Activists want to ban competition – the South African pigeon race is a million dollars.

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